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Posts Tagged ‘Pope Francis’

Wikipedia defines Crowdfunding as the practice of funding a project or venture by raising monetary contributions from a large number of people. Crowdfunding is a form of crowdsourcing and of alternative finance. The USCCB calls for the New Evangelization, a ‘re-proposing’ of the Gospel in a special way.

Combine these two trends with a bit of apostolic succession and a pinch of infallibility and you have Crowdfunding for Christ or simply Missio.

Launched by Pope Francis, Missio offers you a direct connection with his Missions and with those helping our mission family. Missio is an opportunity to choose how to put your faith into action, and a way to answer the call to each one of us who are baptized to be missionaries ourselves, through prayer and sacrifice, in word and deed.

Missio offers you a place to encounter the Missions whenever and wherever you are.

Every project on Missio is led by a change-maker half a world away. These change-makers, many of them religious Sisters and priests, offer help to the most vulnerable communities of our world. They provide essential education and health care, social outreach and advocacy, and pastoral service. In every moment, they also offer spiritual comfort to the suffering and marginalized.

Join the world’s change-makers.

 


Download the app on iTunes: http://bit.ly/MissioiTunes
Download the app on GooglePlay: http://bit.ly/MissioGoogle

 

James DobkowskiJames Henry is the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul, ‘Twas, and the new book series Hail Mary. To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldmanand McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com.

 

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fivefingerprayer

The Five-Finger Prayer has been around for a while. It was reportedly written by the Archbishop of Argentina, Cardinal Bergoglio, a guy you might know as Pope Francis.

1. The thumb is the closest finger to you. So start praying for those who are closest to you. They are the persons easiest to remember. To pray for our dear ones is a “sweet obligation.”

2. The next finger is the index. Pray for those who teach you, instruct you and heal you. They need the support and wisdom to show direction to others. Always keep them in your prayers.

3. The following finger is the tallest. It reminds us of our leaders, the governors and those who have authority. They need God’s guidance.

4. The fourth finger is the ring finger. Even that it may surprise you, it is our weakest finger. It should remind us to pray for the weakest, the sick or those plagued by problems. They need your prayers.

5. And finally we have our smallest finger, the smallest of all. Your pinkie should remind you to pray for yourself. When you are done praying for the other four groups, you will be able to see your own needs but in the proper perspective, and also you will be able to pray for your own needs in a better way.

Amen!

 

 

James DobkowskiJames Henry is the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul, ‘Twas, and the new book series Hail Mary. To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldman/McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com.

 

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Most American Christians believe that all Christians celebrate Easter on the same day. In fact, last year, 2016, one of the U.S. presidential candidates, wrote this:

This weekend, Christians of every denomination remember the most transformative event in history – Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection – the ultimate sacrifice that redeemed the whole world.

The fact is not every Christian denomination remembers Christ’s resurrection on the same Sunday. In fact, last year, for the majority of Americans, we celebrated Easter on March 27th.  However, our Orthodox brothers and sisters, celebrated the resurrection in May. (May 1st to be exact.)

This Easter both Church traditions will celebrate a unified Easter in the first time in years.

So, why are there two Easters?

Historically, the early Church did not have a set date for Easter.  In fact, not every Christian remembered Christ’s resurrection on Sunday.

The Catholic Encyclopedia informs us, that according to Irenaeus, “St. Polycarp, who like the other Asiatics, kept Easter on the fourteenth day of the moon, whatever day of the week that might be, following therein the tradition which he claimed to have derived from St. John the Apostle, came to Rome c. 150 about this very question, but could not be persuaded by Pope Anicetus to relinquish his Quartodeciman observance.”[1]

Interesting!

After that controversy ended, the Catholic Encyclopedia states that:

“…the second stage in the Easter controversy centers round the Council of Nicaea (A.D. 325). Granted that the great Easter festival was always to be held on a Sunday, and was not to coincide with a particular phase of the moon, which might occur on any day of the week, a new dispute arose as to the determination of the Sunday itself. The text of the decree of the Council of Nicaea which settled, or at least indicated a final settlement of, the difficulty has not been preserved to us, but we have an important document inserted in Eusebius’s “Life of Constantine” (III, xviii sq.). The emperor himself, writing to the Churches after the Council of Nicaea, exhorts them to adopt its conclusions and says among other things: “At this meeting the question concerning the most holy day of Easter was discussed, and it was resolved by the united judgment of all present that this feast ought to be kept by all and in every place on one and the same day. . . in the city of Rome and in Africa, throughout Italy and in Egypt. . . with entire unity of judgment.” [2]

As already stated, we don’t have the exact words of the great council, but we may safely infer from scattered notes that the council ruled:

  • that Easter must be celebrated by all throughout the world on the same Sunday;
  • that this Sunday must follow the fourteenth day of the paschal moon;
  • that that moon was to be accounted the paschal moon whose fourteenth day followed the spring equinox;
  • that some provision should be made, probably by the Church of Alexandria as best skilled in astronomical calculations, for determining the proper date of Easter and communicating it to the rest of the world.

This was not a perfect solution. But it appears, by 525 AD all the Christian communities of the world were celebrating the Resurrection of Our Lord on the same Sunday.

So, what happened?

Why do Russian and Orthodox Christians celebrate Easter or Pascha, on one Sunday and everybody else celebrates the Resurrection of Our Lord on another Sunday?

Well, the Gregorian calendar happened — kinda.

According to Wiki: The Gregorian calendar, also called the Western calendar and the Christian calendar, is internationally the most widely used civil calendar. It is named for Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582.

Wiki states: The calendar was a refinement to the Julian calendar amounting to a 0.002% correction in the length of the year. The motivation for the reform was to bring the date for the celebration of Easter to the time of the year in which it was celebrated when it was introduced by the early Church. Because the celebration of Easter was tied to the spring equinox, the Roman Catholic Church considered the steady drift in the date of Easter caused by the year being slightly too long to be undesirable. The reform was adopted initially by the Catholic countries of Europe. Protestants and Eastern Orthodox countries continued to use the traditional Julian calendar and adopted the Gregorian reform after a time, for the sake of convenience in international trade. The last European country to adopt the reform was Greece, in 1923.

Blah, blah, blah-blah, blaaaah!

However, the Orthodox Church vigorously opposes the use of the Gregorian calendar, writes Fr. Jon Magoulias, a Greek-Orthodox priest at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Modesto, California.

This, he informs us, resulted in the West and East celebrating all Church feast days on different dates, the Orthodox celebrations always falling thirteen days behind the Western. [3]

In 1923, Fr. Jon Magoulias continued, an inter-Orthodox congress was held in Constantinople attended by representatives of some, but not all, Orthodox churches. This congress made the very controversial decision to follow a revised calendar that was essentially the same as the Gregorian calendar, for all things except the celebration of Pascha, which continued to be calculated according to the original Julian calendar. The result being that today the Orthodox celebrate most feast days, like Christmas, Epiphany and the rest, at the same time as Western Christians and only Pascha and the feast days that are connected with it like Pentecost and the Ascension, are dated according to the Julian calendar and celebrated on different dates. [4]

Fr. Magoulias stated that for Orthodox, it is important to maintain the teachings and traditions of the Church intact and pure [5] — and I would argue, for Catholics, this applies as well.

But remember, I said the problem was that “the Gregorian calendar happened — kinda.” Well, the kinda is kinda important.

Well, Catholics believe Easter Sunday formula handed down bythe First Ecumenical Council, held in Nicea in 325 AD is: The first Sunday which occurs after the first full moon (or more accurately after the first fourteenth day of the moon) following the vernal equinox. For Orthodox Christians, the formula is this: Pascha is to be celebrated on the first Sunday, after the first full moon, following the first day of Spring (March 21 on the Julian calendar), but always after Jewish Passover — and that’s the kinda that makes all the difference!

Because of this difference, Christians celebrate the most Holiest of our Holy days on different days. By doing this, it appears to me, that we are acting more like they who divided His garments by casting lots than those followers who near the cross of Jesus stood.

Personally, I think holding on to the tradition of the Julian calendar is a bit like cutting off your nose to spite your face. We know it was an inaccurate measuring tool. It’s definitely not Divine. So, why continue to use it?

I understand that Orthodoxy can also point to Canon VII of the Holy Apostles to counter any argument against the Julian calendar.

For those unfamiliar, Canon VII states: If any Bishop, or Presbyter, or Deacon celebrate the holy day of Easter before the vernal equinox with the Jews, let him be deposed. However, in the same breath, Canons XLV and LVX of the Holy Apostles respectively state: “Let any Bishop, or Presbyter, or deacon that merely joins in prayer with heretics be suspended, but if he had permitted them” and “If any clergymen, or laymen, enter a synagogue of Jews, or of heretics, to pray, let him be both deposed and excommunicated.”

To that I ask: “How close are these Canons adhered to today by Orthodox clergymen or laymen alike today?” (For the record: My Lutheran wife and I often hold hands in prayer and my kid’s dojo is held in the hall of a synagogue. Just saying.)

Now, I would never ask anyone to compromise their beliefs, but there has to be some wiggle room here. It’s also not my intent is not to pick on our Orthodox brothers and sisters — alone.

To Catholics, I ask you to answer this: Is there 100% certainty that you got the Easter formula correct? It appears that the formula was never written down. Even the Colonel’s fried chicken recipe and secret recipe for Coca Cola are written down somewhere. And since even the followers of the Apostle John got the formula wrong and later adjusted their practice, maybe we can conclude our date formula for Easter does not meet the standard of “an infallible Church teaching”?

Maybe?

The Good News (pun intended): This year, Christians of every denomination will remember the most transformative event in history – Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection – uno die et uno tempore per omnem orbem.

The bad news is this isn’t going to happen again until 2034!  We need to change this.  Unfortunately, there’s only one person who can initiate this change: Pope Francis.

Source: Günther Simmermacher | Pixaby

Here’s several ways you can address a letter to him.

  • His Holiness, Pope Francis PP. / 00120 Via del Pellegrino / Citta del Vaticano
  • His Holiness Pope Francis / Apostolic Palace / Vatican City
  • His Holiness Pope Francis / Vatican City State, 00120

Do not write “Italy” on the envelop as the country. The Vatican is considered its own independent nation

If we don’t unify now, after 2017, Christians will not celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus the Christ on the same day and at the same time throughout the world until 2034. Maybe that’s why the enemy is having such an easy time as of late. Think about it.

Kalo Pascha 2017!

 

James Henry is also the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul and the new bDobkowskiook series Hail Mary. To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldman/McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com

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FILE - This March 14, 1963 file photo shows Harper Lee, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "To kill a Mockingbird." Publisher Harper announced Tuesday, Feb. 3, 2015, that "Go Set a Watchman," a novel Lee completed in the 1950s and put aside, will be released July 14. It will be her second published book. (AP Photo, File)

FILE – This March 14, 1963 file photo shows Harper Lee, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, “To kill a Mockingbird.” Publisher Harper announced Tuesday, Feb. 3, 2015, that “Go Set a Watchman,” a novel Lee completed in the 1950s and put aside, will be released July 14. It will be her second published book. (AP Photo, File)

Wow, we lost two great writers, Harper Lee and Umberto Eco, in one day. They authored “To Kill A Mockingbird” and “The Name of the Rose”, respectively. Both classics! Not only were these two awesome books, the movies translated from these books are two of my favorites.

I went on the air just just after Harper Lee’s death was announced. Before discussing the Pope and Donald Trump, the host Jack Riccardi on 550-KTSA AM CBS News Radio in San Antonio and I begin our conversation addressing the loss of Harper Lee.

Listen Now

Meet the Author

 

Dobkowski

James Henry is also the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul and the new book series Hail Mary. To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldman/McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com

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Trump Pope Not A Christian

This morning, I told my wife that I was going to write a blog about the “Brother of the Prodigal Son.” Then, this afternoon, a publicist contacted me and asked if I wanted to jump into the so-called feud between Pope Francis and Donald Trump.

The subject of the email read:

Jim, send me a few lines on this asap.

Attached was a link to a CBS News article titled: Pope Francis: Donald Trump “is not Christian.”

Based on the position of the quotes in the headlines, my first thought was “this is going to be bull.” Isn’t this the same guy who said, “Who Am I to judge?”

So, I thought, there’s just three possibilities: Either Pope Francis was misquoted then or is being misquoted now or the Pontiff was misquoted both times. (The latter being the most probable.)

With that, I responded with this:

I don’t know the question asked by the reporter or how it was framed, but by reading beyond the headline it appears the Pope is suggesting that the person described to him would not be Christian — not Donald Trump. So, suggesting otherwise is NOT GOSPEL. Instead of trying to stoke a feud between Pope Francis and Donald Trump, our nation should instead be focusing on the bridge of friendship built between the late conservative Justice Scalia and his judicial opposite (and “best buddy”) Justice Scalia.

The publicist reply:

That’s not what they’re looking for…

The New York Times version of the article was embedded in the email. Immediately I read the first line of the article:

ABOARD THE PAPAL AIRLINER — Inserting himself into the Republican presidential race, Pope Francis on Wednesday suggested that Donald J. Trump “is not Christian” because of the harshness of his campaign promises to deport more immigrants and force Mexico to pay for a wall along the border.

Though the New York Times states that Pope Francis is “inserting himself in the Republican presidential race”, the reality is when asked if Catholics should vote for Donald Trump, “Pope Francis” CBS News reported, “wasn’t willing to advise Catholics on whether to vote for Donald Trump at all.” So, it’s the NY Times who is inserting Pope Francis into the GOP race — for obvious reasons.

Yup, I was right.  This is pure bull.  So I replied:

It’s BULLSHIT! Pope didn’t say it. He wouldn’t say it. There’s an effin wall around Vatican City! He said “A person who thinks ONLY about building walls … is not Christian…. We must see if he said things in that way and I will give him the benefit of the doubt.”

Is that better 🙂

Immediately, my Catholic guilt kicked in and I again replied:

Sorry. This is a lose-lose. But thanks for thinking of me. I’m sure this going to be HUGE.

The publicist replied:

Its OK, I want you to say, As a Catholic, I think………….

It’s humbling when the publicist acts with more grace than the inspirational author who s/he’s trying to promote. With that, I replied with this quote:

As a Catholic, I think the Pope doesn’t have the right to involve himself in the politics of nations — he has a moral obligation. With that said, I don’t believe the headlines that the Holy Father said Mr. Trump “was not Christian.” He wouldn’t say it. Heck, there’s a wall around the Vatican. Pope Francis said “A person who thinks ONLY about building walls … is not Christian…. We must see if he said things in that way and I will give him the benefit of the doubt.” In other words, the Pope said of Donald Trump,  “Who Am I to judge?”

Would I love the publicity for my book? Heck yes! But I’m not willing to toss the Pope, Donald Trump, or anyone, for that matter, under-the-bus just to sell a few books. That’s not what my book Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul is about.  It’s about lifting up others and in turn, lifting oneself up.  It’s about “Making Yourself Great!”  Gee, why does that sound familiar?

Hmmmm, I guess, in a way, I did write about the Prodigal Son and his brother today.

 

Dobkowski

Besides Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul., James H Dobkowski has authored several books. You can find his books on Amazon.com.

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