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There is a new saint rising among the ranks.  It’s St. Baldrick!

Baldrick, one can argue, doesn’t fall within the ancient category of a saint.  In fact, some will argue that St. Baldrick never really existed, so the saint of the willing-to-be-bald-for-a-cause really isn’t a saint, at all.

The truth be told, there is no evidence that every saint venerated today truly ever existed. Let’s take Saint Christopher for example.

This popular saint may have only exist in name only.  

Christopher many believe is simply an honorary title given to the patron of travelers.  We don’t actually know for sure, but that doesn’t take away from the mysticism found in the veneration of St. Christopher.  

Likewise, it doesn’t take away from the mystical experience of St. Baldrick’s!

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Saints just don’t intercede, if you will, on behalf of the collect on Earth.  They are also beacons of light that guide us through the darkness of our times.

Is there anything darker than childhood cancer?

As beacons, saints can also be a present day example of goodness and can motivate us to better ourselves; and in turn they inspire us to build stronger, more loving communities, making us all — even if it’s just for a short period of time — saints, as well.

3835962Every year, because of St. Baldrick, communities put aside their differences to gather together in fellowship to willingly donate their time, talents and treasures (in the form of hair) and take on a common foe, all with a shared sense of hope that one day the cure for childhood cancer will be found.

That sounds like the work of a true saint!

Like Saint Christopher, St. Baldrick may exist in name only, with no date of beatification or canonization and with no official recognition by the Church.  

Yet, like St. Christopher, despite these technicalities, St. Baldrick continues to intercede today on our behalf,  especially our children — and that’s the true miracle of St. Baldrick’s.

St. Baldrick's before

Moments before we got our “buzz” on!

You can donate to St. Baldrick’s.  Just CLICK HERE.

St. Baldrick's afterJames Henry is the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul, Hail Mary series, and two children’s books: The Second Prince and Klaus: The Gift-giver to ALL!  As a writer, James has been widely featured on Bob Salter (CBS Radio), Mike Siegel, Mancow, and more.

Today, James lives in New York where he continues to teach — and write.

To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldman/McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com.

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St, Patrick

Image by Geraldine Dukes from Pixabay

The Feast of Saint Patrick, or simply, St. Patrick’s Day is a religious holiday held on March 17th, the traditional day of Saint Patrick’s death.  

Since the 9th century, Irish Catholics have historically gathered two days past the ides of March to venerate the priestly spirit of this saintly man named Patrick, who challenged a pagan people to embrace the one true God — and won!

To my surprise, I discovered that Saint Patrick’s Day is not only an official feast day in the Catholic Church, but also in the Anglican Communion, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Lutheran Church.

Surprising since St. Patrick’s Day was made an official Christian feast day by the Church in the 17th century, almost a century after the Protestant divide and almost 700 years after the Great Schism, showing the impact Patrick had on the entire Christian community.

I understand the significance of this day for the Irish diaspora.  However, as grand St. Patrick’s accomplishments might have been, the day we celebrate his legacy has become an amateur drinking festival, hijacked by politicians and corporate sponsors.

Now, don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with eating too much Corned Beef and knocking back a few pints to celebrate your Irish heritage.  I do!

I somewhat agree with John Waters that “Drinking in Ireland is not simply a convivial pastime, it is a ritualistic alternative to real life, a spiritual placebo, a fumble for eternity, a longing for heaven, a thirst for return to the embrace of the Almighty.”

Even Saint John Paul the Great thought it necessary for Catholics to have an intimate connection between faith and culture (Walsh, pg 15).

In the past, however, the majority of us who have had a wee’bit too much of the Shamrock never lost the thirst of the Almighty.

More and more, Irish Americans self-identify with beer drinking and bar-hopping than then we do with the Faith handed to us by St. Patrick.

The Celtic spirit burns in all of us – and sometimes, its a’bit hard to control.  (Trust me, I know).

So, on St. Patrick’s Day let your Celtic light shine!    But let’s  not forget why it shines!   It shines because our Patron Saint gave us the gift of the True Light!

As always, the Irish say it best.

Saint Patrick was a gentleman,
Who through strategy and stealth,
Drove all the snakes from Ireland,
Here’s a toasting to his health.
But not too many toastings
Lest you lose yourself and then
Forget the good Saint Patrick
And see all those snakes again.

Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig oraibh!  Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

James DobkowskiJames Henry is the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul, Hail Mary series, and two children’s books: The Second Prince and Klaus: The Gift-giver to ALL!  As a writer, James has been widely featured on Bob Salter (CBS Radio), Mike Siegel, Mancow, and more.

Today, James lives in New York where he continues to teach — and write.

To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldman/McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com. 

Icon of Peter and Andrew

Icon of Sts. Peter and Andrew that Ecumenical Patriarch Athenagoras gave to Pope Paul

Most American Christians believe that all Christians celebrate Easter on the same day. In fact, 2016, one of the U.S. presidential candidates, wrote this:

This weekend, Christians of every denomination remember the most transformative event in history – Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection – the ultimate sacrifice that redeemed the whole world.

The fact is not every Christian denomination remembers Christ’s resurrection on the same Sunday.  In fact, this year, for the majority of Americans, we will celebrate Easter on April 21.  However, this year, our Eastern Orthodox brothers and sisters, will celebrate the resurrection a week later on April 28.

So, why are there two Easters?

Historically, the early Church did not have a set date for Easter.  In fact, not every Christian remembered Christ’s resurrection on Sunday.

The Catholic Encyclopedia informs us, that according to Irenaeus, “St. Polycarp, who like the other Asiatics, kept Easter on the fourteenth day of the moon, whatever day of the week that might be, following therein the tradition which he claimed to have derived from St. John the Apostle, came to Rome c. 150 about this very question, but could not be persuaded by Pope Anicetus to relinquish his Quartodeciman observance.”[1]

Interesting!

After that controversy ended, the Catholic Encyclopedia states that:

“…the second stage in the Easter controversy centers round the Council of Nicaea (A.D. 325). Granted that the great Easter festival was always to be held on a Sunday, and was not to coincide with a particular phase of the moon, which might occur on any day of the week, a new dispute arose as to the determination of the Sunday itself. The text of the decree of the Council of Nicaea which settled, or at least indicated a final settlement of, the difficulty has not been preserved to us, but we have an important document inserted in Eusebius’s “Life of Constantine” (III, xviii sq.). The emperor himself, writing to the Churches after the Council of Nicaea, exhorts them to adopt its conclusions and says among other things: “At this meeting the question concerning the most holy day of Easter was discussed, and it was resolved by the united judgment of all present that this feast ought to be kept by all and in every place on one and the same day. . . in the city of Rome and in Africa, throughout Italy and in Egypt. . . with entire unity of judgment.” [2]

As already stated, we don’t have the exact words of the great council, but we may safely infer from scattered notes that the council ruled:

  • that Easter must be celebrated by all throughout the world on the same Sunday;
  • that this Sunday must follow the fourteenth day of the paschal moon;
  • that that moon was to be accounted the paschal moon whose fourteenth day followed the spring equinox;
  • that some provision should be made, probably by the Church of Alexandria as best skilled in astronomical calculations, for determining the proper date of Easter and communicating it to the rest of the world.

This was not a perfect solution. But it appears, by 525 AD all the Christian communities of the world were celebrating the Resurrection of Our Lord on the same Sunday.

So, what happened?

Why do Russian and Orthodox Christians celebrate Easter or Pascha, on one Sunday and everybody else celebrates the Resurrection of Our Lord on another Sunday?

Well, the Gregorian calendar happened — kinda.

According to Wiki: The Gregorian calendar, also called the Western calendar and the Christian calendar, is internationally the most widely used civil calendar. It is named for Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582.

Wiki states: The calendar was a refinement to the Julian calendar amounting to a 0.002% correction in the length of the year. The motivation for the reform was to bring the date for the celebration of Easter to the time of the year in which it was celebrated when it was introduced by the early Church. Because the celebration of Easter was tied to the spring equinox, the Roman Catholic Church considered the steady drift in the date of Easter caused by the year being slightly too long to be undesirable. The reform was adopted initially by the Catholic countries of Europe. Protestants and Eastern Orthodox countries continued to use the traditional Julian calendar and adopted the Gregorian reform after a time, for the sake of convenience in international trade. The last European country to adopt the reform was Greece, in 1923.

Blah, blah, blah-blah, blaaaah!

However, the Orthodox Church vigorously opposes the use of the Gregorian calendar, writes Fr. Jon Magoulias, a Greek-Orthodox priest at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Modesto, California.

This, he informs us, resulted in the West and East celebrating all Church feast days on different dates, the Orthodox celebrations always falling thirteen days behind the Western. [3]

In 1923, Fr. Jon Magoulias continued, an inter-Orthodox congress was held in Constantinople attended by representatives of some, but not all, Orthodox churches. This congress made the very controversial decision to follow a revised calendar that was essentially the same as the Gregorian calendar, for all things except the celebration of Pascha, which continued to be calculated according to the original Julian calendar.

The result being that today the Orthodox celebrate most feast days, like Christmas, Epiphany and the rest, at the same time as Western Christians and only Pascha and the feast days that are connected with it like Pentecost and the Ascension, are dated according to the Julian calendar and celebrated on different dates. [4]

Fr. Magoulias stated that for Orthodox, it is important to maintain the teachings and traditions of the Church intact and pure [5] — and I would argue, for Catholics, this applies as well.

But remember, I said the problem was that “the Gregorian calendar happened — kinda.” Well, the kinda is kinda important.

Catholics under the See of Peter believe Easter Sunday formula handed down by the First Ecumenical Council, held in Nicea in 325 AD is:

The first Sunday which occurs after the first full moon (or more accurately after the first fourteenth day of the moon) following the vernal equinox.

For Orthodox Christians, who no longer recognized the Pontiff as first among equals, the formula is this:

Pascha is to be celebrated on the first Sunday, after the first full moon, following the first day of Spring (March 21 on the Julian calendar), but always after Jewish Passover.  (This year, Passover or Pesach begins at sundown on April 19th (Nisan 14)  and will continue for 7 days until Friday, the 26th of April.)

And, that’s the kinda that makes all the difference!

Because of this difference, Christians celebrate the most Holiest of our Holy days on different days. By doing this, it appears to me, that we are acting more like they who divided His garments by casting lots than those followers who near the cross of Jesus stood.

Personally, I think holding on to the tradition of the Julian calendar is a bit like cutting off your nose to spite your face. We know it was an inaccurate measuring tool. It’s definitely not Divine. So, why continue to use it?

I understand that Orthodoxy can also point to Canon VII of the Holy Apostles to counter any argument against the Julian calendar.

For those unfamiliar, Canon VII states:

If any Bishop, or Presbyter, or Deacon celebrate the holy day of Easter before the vernal equinox with the Jews, let him be deposed. However, in the same breath, Canons XLV and LVX of the Holy Apostles respectively state: “Let any Bishop, or Presbyter, or deacon that merely joins in prayer with heretics be suspended, but if he had permitted them” and “If any clergymen, or laymen, enter a synagogue of Jews, or of heretics, to pray, let him be both deposed and excommunicated.

To that I ask: “How close are these Canons adhered to today by Orthodox clergymen or laymen alike today?” (For the record: My Lutheran wife and I often hold hands in prayer and my kid’s dojo is held in the hall of a synagogue. Just saying.)

Now, I would never ask anyone to compromise their beliefs, but there has to be some wiggle room here. It’s also not my intent is to pick only on our Orthodox brothers and sisters.

To Catholics, I ask you to answer this: Is there 100% certainty that you got the Easter formula correct?

It appears that the formula was never written down. Heck, even the Colonel’s fried chicken recipe and the secret recipe for Coca Cola are written down somewhere.

And since even the followers of the Apostle John got the formula wrong and later adjusted their practice, maybe we can conclude our date formula for Easter does not meet the standard of “an infallible Church teaching”?

Maybe?

Since sharing the same Pascha in 2017, Christians will not celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus the Christ on the same day and at the same time throughout the world until 2034.

We need this to change — and there’s only two people who can truly make this happen: Pope Francis and the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartolomaios.

Francis-Bartholomew-1

Catholic News Service photo/L’Osservatore Romano via Reuters


Here’s several ways you can address a letter to Pope Francis.

  • His Holiness, Pope Francis PP. / 00120 Via del Pellegrino / Citta del Vaticano
  • His Holiness Pope Francis / Apostolic Palace / Vatican City
  • His Holiness Pope Francis / Vatican City State, 00120

Do not write “Italy” or “Rome” on the envelop as the country. The Vatican is considered its own independent nation.

Since, unlike previous popes, Pope Francis is living in Casa Santa Martha instead of the papal apartment, another address you can try is this:

His Holiness, Pope Francis
Saint Martha House
00120 Città del Vaticano, Vatican City

Contact information for Patriarch Bartholomew His All-Holiness Bartholomew
Archbishop of Constantinople-New Rome and Ecumenical Patriarch:

Mailing Address of the Ecumenical Patriarchate:
Rum Patrikliği, Dr. Sadık Ahmet Cad. No. 19, 34083 Fatih-İstanbul, TURKEY
Tel:  +90 (212) 531.9670 – 6
Fax: +90 (212) 531.6533
E-mail: patriarchate@ec-patr.org

 

 

 

It’s time to call on the successors of Peter and Andrew to start acting more like brethren, and not children  (Cor 14:20).

 

Kalo Pascha! Festa Paschalia!

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James Henry is the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul, Hail Mary series, and two children’s books: The Second Prince and Klaus: The Gift-giver to ALL!  As a writer, James has been widely featured on Bob Salter (CBS Radio), Mike Siegel, Mancow, and more.

Today, James lives in New York where he continues to teach — and write.

To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldman/McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com.

ash-wednesday-corporation-you

 

Today is Ash Wednesday.

For six years, I lived and worked in Southern California, within the bounds of the largest Catholic archdiocese in United States where I attended Mass and services at the parish of St. Finbar in Burbank.

Almost 5 million Catholics work, live, and worship in the Los Angeles community of 11 million people which prides itself on its embrace of multiculturalism.

Oddly enough, when I lived in So Cal, not one Ash Wednesday passed without someone pointing out that I had “something” on my forehead.

The first time it occurred, I was in a Target. The person was kind and concerned as she approached and expressed her concern.

“Excuse me, sir,” she said. “You have something on your forehead.”
“It’s Ashes,” I replied, believing she would then know what I was talking about. She didn’t. “It’s Ash Wednesday,” I continued. Still nothing. “I’m Catholic,” I added. “We put Ashes on our forehead to mark the beginning of the season called Lent.”
“Wow, that’s cool,” she smiled, then walked off.

I have to admit; though I chuckled, I was equally amazed that she didn’t know. The following year, it occurred again.

My wife and I went to have sushi after receiving ashes to meet our holy obligation of eating fish. (And yes, I’m aware that sushi is not the true intended act of penance imposed by the Church to commemorate the day.)

As we we’re leaving the restaurant, the Japanese-accented Sushi Chef called out to us.

“Thank you for coming,” he said. “Have good day.”
“You too!” my wife and I added in unison.
“Excuse me, you have something on you –,” he added, pointing to his forehead.
“Yes, thank you,” I replied. “It’s ashes. It’s Ash Wednesday.”
“Oh my goodness,” he humbly replied seemingly losing his accent. “I’m a lapsed Catholic.”

We chuckled. First at the loss of the shame-filled Sushi’s Chef’s Japanese accent; but also at the fact that it happened again!

I was equally amazed that he didn’t know.

IMG_1351The most noted case of mistaken ashes came when British Sky News reporters, on Ash Wednesday, thought the dirty mark above the brow of then Vice-President Joe Biden was also just something on his forehead.

It’s quite humorous. The reporter, another self-proclaimed lapsed Catholic, finally realizes three minutes and 10 seconds into the broadcast that Joe Biden’s something is, in fact, ashes, and humbly apologizes.

Take a look at it HERE.

In her defense, and the defense of the others, our ashes often lose their intended shape, that of a cross — especially by the end of the day.  (See below)

Though I no longer live in Los Angeles, I, oddly enough, miss those awkward Ash Wednesday incidents.

I don’t miss them because they made me laugh — even though they did.  I miss them because they revealed, to me, the true nature of the season of Lent that lives in the heart of those of goodwill.

Lent is a season of Penance, yes; but it’s also a season of Reflection.

But what exactly should we reflect on?

Well, how about we reflect on being more Holy, more Christ-like; we can do this by reflecting His loving character more.

In fact, I’d argue that the motivation behind these well-intended interactions were, for the most part, just as Christian as the act of receiving and wearing ashes.

How so?

Then let me start with this question: If Jesus was walking down the street and he saw a smudge on someone’s forehead, what would He do? What would He say?

I think that Jesus would stop, point, and say, “Excuse me, sir. You have something on your forehead.”

So, if today, if you are stopped by a well-intended non-believer or non Church-goer, simply smile and say, “No, that’s not dirt on my forehead. It’s Ashes … but thank you!”

Maybe, you could even take this opportunity to start a conversation — and possibly take the first step in introducing someone else to the Love of Christ.

IMG_1353James Henry is the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul, Hail Mary series, and two children’s books: The Second Prince and Klaus: The Gift-giver to ALL!  As a writer, James has been widely featured on Bob Salter (CBS Radio), Mike Siegel, Mancow, and more.

Today, James lives in New York where he continues to teach — and write.

To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldman/McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com.

 

Lent Fun Fact:
The Catholic practice of abstaining from meat on Friday was the reason for the creation of McDonald’s Filet-o-Fish sandwich.

pay-937884_640

Every year, I begin the genetics unit in my AP Biology class by humbling saying, “You’re going to learn more about genetics in this class than what was taught 30 or 40 years ago in the world’s top colleges.”

These days, in high school science, students move far beyond Mendel’s peas and the genetics of Watson & Crick.  Today, we discuss CRISPR and epigenetics;  things our most creative sci-fi writers would’ve thought were unbelievable — even in fiction.

Even with the current pace of today’s technological advances, there is one breakthrough that I share with my students that many still find impossible to believe.

That is the discovery of the world’s most amazing number.

There’s many amazing numbers out there. For starters, there’s 3.14 or pi.

7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (7 octillion): The number of atoms that makes up an adult human.

2.5 million: The number of years the photons of light journeyed from the Andromeda galaxy before they hit your eye.

Absolute Zero or – 273.15 degrees Celsius: The temperature in which everything in the universe remains motionless.

Two.  The length of your DNA in meters, of one cell, if you stretched it out all the way and in diameters of the Solar System if all the DNA in all your cells were lined up end-to-end.

These are just a few.  We also have lists of amazing numbers.

There are amazing numbers in Biology; numbers cooler than Pi;  numbers in the Bible,  but none of these numbers compare to the world’s most amazing number.

You also may have heard that humans share 97% of our DNA with Chimpanzees.  Even more astonishing, we share 50% of our DNA with a banana.

Some scientists questions these amazing numbers.   However, there’s one number, in the world of genetics, that is truly amazing: Every human on the planet shares 99.5% of their DNA.

This means the difference between you and your most distant human relative on the planet Earth is most likely no more than  0.5%.    This also means…

All the division in the world…  

Every argument.  Every clique.  Every fight.  Every war. 

All the hate.  All the bullying.  All the name-calling and finger-pointing.

All our contempt, rancor, fear-mongering and loathing.

Our political and social divides.

Our racial and ethnic biases. 

Every march.  Every debate.  Every protest.

Every wall that divides us  … amounts to nothing more than 0.5%.

Amazing, isn’t it?  That’s why 0.5 is the world’s most amazing number.

Think about the attention this number commands.  The power that it holds!  The energy it absorbs!  The resources it consumes! The suffering it causes.

The tears it has shed.  The lives it has altered.  It’s destructive force!

Now, just think about all the joy, peace, love and harmony we can experience in this world if we stopped focusing of the 0.5% that separates us all, and instead, focused on the 99.5% that we all have in common.

Now wouldn’t that be truly AMAZING?

James DobkowskiJames Henry is the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul, Hail Mary series, and two children’s books: The Second Prince and Klaus: The Gift-giver to ALL!  As a writer, James has been widely featured on Bob Salter (CBS Radio), Mike Siegel, Mancow, and more.

Today, James lives in New York where he continues to teach — and write.

To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldman/McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com.

John Starks | Photographer

Did I get your attention?

Good!

On YouTube there’s this video titled: Vatican Declares Jesus Christ is Lucifer’s Son!

Have you seen it?  Or should I say them?  There are hundreds, if not thousands, that are posted, similar in scope and hatred … I mean nature.

“This is pretty creepy,” the video stated. “I took the invocation in Latin sung by the priest to get a translation online,” it continued. “And this is what I found”...

The video went on to say that the Vatican, the See of Peter, openly evoked Satan during  public ceremony.

In the video, a Deacon (not a priest) sings:

Flammas eius lúcifer matutínus invéniat:
ille, inquam, Lúcifer, qui nescit occásum.
Christus Fílius tuus, qui, regréssus ab ínferis,
humáno géneri serénus illúxit,
et vivit et regnat in sæcula sæculórum.

Frightening, yes?  Unless you know really know Church History — along with some Latin.

The song is from the Exsultet, part of the Praeconium Paschale, or Easter Proclamation.  Here’s how it’s truly translated into English:

May this flame be found still burning
by the Morning Star:
the one Morning Star who never sets,
Christ your Son,
who, coming back from death’s domain,
has shed his peaceful light on humanity,
and lives and reigns for ever and ever.

In this text, lúcifer translates to be the Morning Star or the Light of the world — NOT THE DEVIL.

Sadly, this fact didn’t stop this YouTuber from grossly misguiding viewers with false claims.  YouTube allows these lies — and many others — to propagate and take hold because, really, when you think about it quid est veritas?

The name Lucifer originally denoted the planet Venus, emphasizing its brilliance.

The Vulgate employs the word lucifer for “the light of the morning” (Job 11:17), “the signs of the zodiac” (Job 38:32), and “the aurora” (Psalm 109:3).

Metaphorically, the word is also applied to the King of Babylon (Isaiah 14:12) as preeminent among the princes of his time; to the high priest Simon son of Onias (Ecclesiasticus 50:6), for his surpassing virtue, to the glory of heaven (Apocalypse 2:28), by reason of its excellency; and finally to Jesus Christ himself (2 Peter 1:19; Apocalypse 22:16; the “Exultet” of Holy Saturday) the true light of our spiritual life. [1]

Did you catch that last line?

[The Vulgate employs the word lucifer] finally to Jesus Christ himself (2 Peter 1:19; Apocalypse 22:16; the “Exultet” of Holy Saturday) the true light of our spiritual life.

Lucifer, in Latin, means light-bearer.

So, if you ever caught a Lightning bug, you caught lucifer — or at least luciferin, a generic term for the light-emitting compound found in organisms that generate bioluminescence.

So, why do English-speakers also call Satan, the Fallen One, by the name Lucifer? It’s a long story.  In short:  Blame St. Jerome.

Christians, it appears, are often so busy today pointing at the speck in the eye of others that they continue to ignore the board in their own eye.

Be careful.   A board can easily be used as a plank that can lead to a greater demise — if you know what I mean.  (Insert “Arrrr, Matey!” here.)

There is one Latin phrase I think Christians may need to begin focusing on for the greater good.  And that is:

Et si regnum in se dividatur, non potest regnum illud stare.

You might recognize it better as Mark 3:24.

And if a kingdom is divided against itself, that kingdom can not stand.

… and this includes the Kingdom of God. 

Far-fetched, you say? Why, so?  Our houses of worship is already divided. 

And it’s just not these boobs on YouTube spreading lies; I’ve come across many touted as reputable and well-educated (Christians and non-Christians, alike) who publicly spread similar falsehoods.

Quid est veritas?

Well, the truth is this: If you’re in the business of spreading lies and causing division,  Jesus might as well be called Lucifer in your world — because, faith or no faith, the Prince of Darkness is really who you’re working for.

James DobkowskiJames Henry is the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul, Hail Mary series, and two children’s books: The Second Prince and Klaus: The Gift-giver to ALL!  As a writer, James has been widely featured on Bob Salter (CBS Radio), Mike Siegel, Mancow, and more.

Today, James lives in New York where he continues to teach — and write.

To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldman/McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com.

ABOUT THE EXSULTET:

Here the full Exsultet in Latin. The verse in question is at the 11 minute mark:

You can compare it to the full English version. The Morning Star verse is at the 9:30 mark:

God geralt

The other day, me and my nine year-old were having an interesting conversation at the dinner table.  We have a lot of interesting conversations; mainly because he’s so interesting.

In our discussion, he was describing how he noticed that certain people just know how to do things and do them well.  Things like advanced math, science, music.

“They’re called geniuses,” I said.

I continued and shared with him a story about a young boy who has no real exposure to classical music.  Neither one of his parents played and instrument;  nor did any of his grandparents.  However, this elementary school kid walked into a music one day, picked up an instrument, and began playing as if he played as if he was an accomplished musician.  He later went on to write several symphonies.

“How?” my son asked.

“I don’t know,” I added.  “However, Uncle Clay and I came up with a theory one night in college.

“No civilization lasts forever,” I explained.  “Eventually, no matter how advanced, they seem to crumble.  The genius, Uncle Clay and I, hypothesized is a fail-safe to rebuilt society after in falls.”

I gave him a few examples…

“The Roman civilization was extremely advanced,” I said.  “We make things out of cement today, but it’s not the same cement the Romans used.  We have to use rebar when we build with cement, so it holds shape and form.  However, the Coliseum in Rome is still standing today without the use of any steel re-enforcing bars.   Historians even believed they had the understandings of Nanotechnology.

“The Roman Empire fell in 476.  But soon, the Arab world rose.  Why? …  Because of the genius. we hypothesized….

“From the Dark Ages came Western Civilization.  Why?  Because of the genius….

“Civilizations rise and fall.  After they fall, it’s the genius that steps in and saves the human race, over and over again….

“That night, Uncle Clay and I came to a conclusion:  For the genius to exist, it has to be programmed into our collective DNA.”

“What DNA?” he asked.

“You know how you program a computer? Well, your DNA is a computer program just for you.  But here’s where it gets cool….

“You and your most distant relative share 99.6% of DNA.  There’s only a 0.4% difference between your DNA — your personal “computer program” — and the person on the planet who is the most-different from you.”

To my surprise, he was still listening.  So, I continued.

“We thought, for the genius to exist, there has to be some kind of genetic memory.  Today, with epigenetics, scientists have recently discovered that genetic memory truly exist!

“So, we were right!

“However, we further theorized, for the genius to be part of our Human genome, for a genius to have evolved, there had to be some kind of knowledge of the future that all civilizations would eventually come to a destructive end….

“And, there’s only one thing that has knowledge of the future…”

“What?” he enthusiastically asked.  At least I want to believe he was enthusiastic.

“Well, it’s not what, but Who?”

“God!?” he replied.

“Yes, God! And that’s the story about the night Uncle Clay and I proved that God exists.”

“Cool,” he calmly added.  “Can I watch EvanTube HD?”

James DobkowskiJames Henry is the author of Corporation YOU: A Business Plan for the Soul, Hail Mary series, and two children’s books: The Second Prince and Klaus: The Gift-giver to ALL!  As a writer, James has been widely featured on Bob Salter (CBS Radio), Mike Siegel, Mancow, and more.

Today, James lives in New York where he continues to teach — and write.

To contact James or book an interview, please contact Mark of Goldman/McCormick PR at (516) 639-0988 or Mark@goldmanmccormick.com.

 

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